Pink Floyd: Atom Heart Mother 1970 (c) Harvest
Storm Thorgerson, inspired by Andy Warhol’s famous “cow wallpaper,” has said that he simply drove out into a rural area near Potters Bar (Hertfordshire, England) and photographed the first cow he saw. The cow’s owner identified her name as “Lulubelle III”. More cows appear on the back cover, again with no text or titles, and on the inside gatefold. 
(c) Wikipedia

Pink Floyd: Atom Heart Mother 1970 (c) Harvest

Storm Thorgerson, inspired by Andy Warhol’s famous “cow wallpaper,” has said that he simply drove out into a rural area near Potters Bar (Hertfordshire, England) and photographed the first cow he saw. The cow’s owner identified her name as “Lulubelle III”. More cows appear on the back cover, again with no text or titles, and on the inside gatefold

(c) Wikipedia

The Who: Meaty, Beaty, Big & Bouncy 1971 (c) Track Record
The panoramic photograph on the album’s inside cover is an exterior shot of the side of the Railway Hotel, a pub that was sited on the bridge next to Harrow & Wealdstone station in north-west London. The Railway Hotel was a popular hangout for Mods and soon after Keith Moon joined the band, the Who became a regular attraction there from June 1964, performing every Tuesday night. It was here that Kit Lambert, their manager, first saw the band, and here that Pete Townshend accidentally cracked his guitar’s neck on the low ceiling above the stage. In response to laughter from the crowd, he then smashed his guitar for the first time in public; a gimmick he maintained for many years when playing live.
(c) Wikipedia

The Who: Meaty, Beaty, Big & Bouncy 1971 (c) Track Record

The panoramic photograph on the album’s inside cover is an exterior shot of the side of the Railway Hotel, a pub that was sited on the bridge next to Harrow & Wealdstone station in north-west London. The Railway Hotel was a popular hangout for Mods and soon after Keith Moon joined the band, the Who became a regular attraction there from June 1964, performing every Tuesday night. It was here that Kit Lambert, their manager, first saw the band, and here that Pete Townshend accidentally cracked his guitar’s neck on the low ceiling above the stage. In response to laughter from the crowd, he then smashed his guitar for the first time in public; a gimmick he maintained for many years when playing live.

(c) Wikipedia