The Cure: Standing On a Beach 1986 (c) Fiction 
The man featured on the album cover was John Button, and was at the time a retired fisherman. He also appeared in the music video for “Killing an Arab.” According to the band’s 2005 autobiography by Jeff Apter, when asked why he agreed to lend his face to the band’s media, Button’s answer was “If I can help these youngsters break through, after all, why not?”
(c) wikipedia

The Cure: Standing On a Beach 1986 (c) Fiction 


The man featured on the album cover was John Button, and was at the time a retired fisherman. He also appeared in the music video for “Killing an Arab.” According to the band’s 2005 autobiography by Jeff Apter, when asked why he agreed to lend his face to the band’s media, Button’s answer was “If I can help these youngsters break through, after all, why not?”

(c) wikipedia

New Order: Power, Corruption & Lies 1983 (c) Factory 
Peter Saville’s design for the album had a colour-based code to represent the band’s name and the title of the album, but they were not actually written on the sleeve itself (they were, however, present on the North American sleeve). The decoder for the code was featured prominently on the back cover of the album and can also be used for the “Blue Monday” and “Confusion” singles. The cover is a reproduction of the painting ”A Basket of Roses” by French artist Henri Fantin-Latour, which is part of the National Gallery’s permanent collection in London.[1] Saville had originally planned to use a Renaissance portrait of a dark prince to tie in with the Machiavellian theme of the title, but couldn’t find a suitable portrait. At the gallery Saville picked up a postcard with Fantin-Latour’s painting, and his girlfriend mockingly asked him if he was going to use it for the cover. Saville then realised it was a great idea.
(c)wikipedia

New Order: Power, Corruption & Lies 1983 (c) Factory 


Peter Saville’s design for the album had a colour-based code to represent the band’s name and the title of the album, but they were not actually written on the sleeve itself (they were, however, present on the North American sleeve). The decoder for the code was featured prominently on the back cover of the album and can also be used for the “Blue Monday” and “Confusion” singles. The cover is a reproduction of the painting ”A Basket of Roses” by French artist Henri Fantin-Latour, which is part of the National Gallery’s permanent collection in London.[1] Saville had originally planned to use a Renaissance portrait of a dark prince to tie in with the Machiavellian theme of the title, but couldn’t find a suitable portrait. At the gallery Saville picked up a postcard with Fantin-Latour’s painting, and his girlfriend mockingly asked him if he was going to use it for the cover. Saville then realised it was a great idea.

(c)wikipedia

The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Electric Ladyland 1968 (c) Reprise, Polydor
A letter Hendrix wrote to Reprise(his American label) described exactly what he wanted for the cover art, but it was mostly ignored. He expressly asked for a color photo by Linda Eastman(McCartney) of the group sitting with children on a sculpture from Alice in Wonderland in Central Park, NY, even drawing a picture of it for reference. The company instead used a blurred red and yellow photo of his head, taken by Karl Ferris. Track Records had its own art department, which produced a cover depicting 19 nude women lounging in front of a black background taken by photographer David Montgomery, who also shot the inside cover portrait of Hendrix. Later reissues for Compact Disc in 1997 and 2010 feature the Ferris cover worldwide, and the Hendrix family has indicated that they will no longer use the nudes cover since Hendrix himself expressed his opinion against nude-cover saying that it was rather an opposite to what he had wanted. 
(c) wikipedia

The Jimi Hendrix Experience: Electric Ladyland 1968 (c) Reprise, Polydor

A letter Hendrix wrote to Reprise(his American label) described exactly what he wanted for the cover art, but it was mostly ignored. He expressly asked for a color photo by Linda Eastman(McCartney) of the group sitting with children on a sculpture from Alice in Wonderland in Central Park, NY, even drawing a picture of it for reference. The company instead used a blurred red and yellow photo of his head, taken by Karl Ferris. Track Records had its own art department, which produced a cover depicting 19 nude women lounging in front of a black background taken by photographer David Montgomery, who also shot the inside cover portrait of Hendrix. Later reissues for Compact Disc in 1997 and 2010 feature the Ferris cover worldwide, and the Hendrix family has indicated that they will no longer use the nudes cover since Hendrix himself expressed his opinion against nude-cover saying that it was rather an opposite to what he had wanted. 

(c) wikipedia

Joy Division: Unknown Pleasures 1979 (c)Factory
Peter Saville,who had previously designed posters for Manchester’s Factory club in 1978, designed the cover of the album. StephenMorris chose the image used on the cover, which is based on an image of radio waves from pulsar CP 1919, from The Cambridge Encyclopaedia of Astronomy. Saville reversed the image from black-on-white to white-on-black and printed it on textured card for the original version of the album.

Joy Division: Unknown Pleasures 1979 (c)Factory

Peter Saville,who had previously designed posters for Manchester’s Factory club in 1978, designed the cover of the album. StephenMorris chose the image used on the cover, which is based on an image of radio waves from pulsar CP 1919, from The Cambridge Encyclopaedia of Astronomy. Saville reversed the image from black-on-white to white-on-black and printed it on textured card for the original version of the album.